• In-home Euthanasia

doginhammockThe decision to euthanize a loved pet is extremely challenging for everyone. It is something that is also very personal and as your pet’s caregiver, you know your pet best. At Copper Hill Animal Clinic we will help you in assessing your pet’s quality of life and aid you in making an educated and supportive decision.

Euthanasia can be a powerful experience that provides relief from pain, emotional suffering, and chronic debility. In many cases, euthanasia can be the kindest, most humane decision for animals at the end of their lives, or for animals suffering from severe illness or injury at any age.

The overwhelming majority of companion animals’ lives end with euthanasia in a veterinarian’s office. While some pets are quite relaxed in a hospital setting, most are stressed. Many of these animals have mobility impairment that makes travel difficult or even painful. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if the euthanasia experience could be as stress-free as possible for pets and as meaningful as possible for their caregivers?

In-home euthanasia can provide a relaxed and personalized experience for animals & families during their final moments together. It is Dr. Vandersande’s belief that we can humanely end an animal’s life without pain, emotional distress or fear, with the goal to make the final goodbye as calm and compassionate as possible. Euthanasia should be a gentle time – un-rushed, peaceful and respectful. The life of an animal is honored when it ends with dignity.

Please call us to discuss if you are considering in-home euthanasia. We are here to help you know when the time is right. You may even request a home visit to help evaluate your pet’s comfort level and see if there are modifications that can be made that will make a difference.

Consider the following questions as markers for your pet’s enjoyment of life. You, as the person who knows your pet best, will be able to answer these better than anyone.

  • Is your pet enjoying his/her food?
  • Is your pet able to go to the bathroom where appropriate? (dogs and cats don’t like to have accidents
    any more than we like them to.)
  • Is he or she still enjoying the company of their people?
  • Is he or she relatively free from pain?
  • Is he or she having more good days than bad days?
  • Does he or she still avoid the things that they didn’t want to do before?